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Chapter 1 - Holding Chapter

1 - 1 An example of an interactive figure from the book

This figure takes advantage of html5 and javascript to help the student understand how enzymes work to speed reactions.

Number of Acetyl CoA: 0

Timer:

Carbon Dioxide:

CFeSP w/ Methyl:

Coenzyme A (CoA):

Figure 8.7. A chemical reaction catalyzed by an enzyme. This animation is a simulation of the synthesis of acetyl-CoA by Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase and Acetyl-CoA Synthase. These reactions are part of the Wood–Ljungdahl pathway. In the first panel, set the amount of each substrate (Carbon Dioxide, CFeSP w/ Methyl, and Coenzyme A) using the sliders or the textbox. Click either one of the buttons (Start No Enzymes or Start with Enzymes) to observe the rate of acetyl-CoA synthesis. Note how increasing the concentration of substrate or adding enzymes increases the rate of reaction.